Carmine Infantino

Showcase 14 (May-June 1958)

Once again, neither Flash story is particularly impressive, though Infantino (inked both stories by Frank Giacoia) creates some neat-looking space ships in the first one. The second has some great art for maybe three pages, then the quality falls off a lot. The stories themselves read fast and don’t have much personality or thought. For […]

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Showcase 13 (March-April 1958)

What a bad issue for Flash. Joe Giella’s inks on Infantino don’t have any perspective. Faces are flat, even with features implying depth. Then, on the second story, Frank Giacoia’s inks give everything a sketchy look. Neither story looks like each other, much less the standard Infantino. Robert Kanigher writes the first story, with Barry […]

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Showcase 8 (May-June 1957)

Unfortunately, this issue does not feature the Flash fighting a giant finger. Instead, he fights some evil triplets and then Captain Cold (in different stories). The first story–written by Robert Kanigher–is better. Barry has to figure different things out in order to defeat the bad guys and Kanigher does show some of Barry’s character. There’s […]

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Showcase 4 (September-October 1956)

It’s hard to say who’s more enthusiastic about The Flash–Robert Kanigher or John Broome. Kanigher does the origin, Broome does the second adventure. Broome tackles time travel… Kanigher has Flash in a speedboat. I guess Broome wins. Both have Carmine Infantino (inked by Joe Kubert) on art. Infantino doesn’t quite know how to tell a […]

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Detective Comics 500 (March 1981)

For issue 500, DC went with something rather celebratory for Detective Comics–it’s very oversized (84 pages) and has many Detective Comics regulars–back to Slam Bradley–making appearances. The opening Batman story, from Alan Brennert and Dick Giordano, is fantastic one about Batman going Earth-3 to save his parents. It’s a great, touching story. I love it. […]

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Superman 242 (September 1971)

The Pseudo-Superman story comes to its close with Superman choosing to be de-powered. It’s a strange move, since he’s still really, really powerful. Maybe not Silver Age powerful, but he hadn’t really been doing those feats during the rest of the issues… it’s a little confusing. It’s an effective scene, but it doesn’t hold up […]

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Spider-Woman 5 (August 1978)

Wolfman edited Spider-Woman too? I guess I hadn’t paid much attention. Now a lot more makes sense. Without any editorial oversight, Wolfman can keep going with whatever he thinks works (to be fair, Spider-Woman did run fifty issues–five years–so he must have been in sync with readers) and what does he go with? A dream […]

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Spider-Woman 4 (July 1978)

Can this series make any less sense? I mean, I’m not even going after Wolfman’s characterization of Spider-Woman as a social outcast who has a great vocabulary, not even mentioning the whole, everyone hates Jessica Drew thing. I’m getting the feeling I’d hate Jessica Drew too, if Wolfman were scripting her. I don’t even know […]

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Spider-Woman 3 (June 1978)

At least Spider-Woman’s stalker doesn’t show up in this issue. It’s kind of sad how phoned-in Infantino’s artwork is on this series. I don’t think I’ve ever seen him do Marvel before and he’s just completely disinterested. Some of his subsequent DC work is a lot better, so it’s not like he couldn’t do the […]

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Spider-Woman 2 (May 1978)

Vixen. A spiteful or quarrelsome woman. Vixen. Marv Wolfman refers to his protagonist as a vixen in this issue. Not so sure he knows what the word means and for someone so flatulent in his writing, he really ought to have a dictionary handy. I’m not entirely sure what’s wrong with this comic book, whether […]

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Spider-Woman 1 (April 1978)

Wow, does Wolfman like to write exposition. I mean, he just loves it. It really made this issue incredibly boring. Maybe I wasn’t paying attention, but I had no idea–until a few pages into it–the issue is taking place in London. I’m also not sure if Jessica Drew is English or not. I mean, does […]

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