Daniel J. Travanti, Faye Dunaway, John Laughlin, and Kim Cattrall star in MIDNIGHT CROSSING, directed by Roger Holzberg for Vestron Pictures.

Midnight Crossing (1988, Roger Holzberg)

Midnight Crossing is a terribly written piece of garbage, but there’s some definite potential to it. It takes forever for the potential to show.

The movie opens with one of the worst directed, worst written action sequences I can think of. Then it flashes forward to modern day and it’s bad, but sometimes funny. At this point, Holzberg’s direction isn’t terrible. He’s shooting in Miami and it’s generally pleasant looking. Then he gets on the boat, which should be better, but it isn’t. It’s worse.

The two big problems are the script and Daniel J. Travanti. Wisconsin-born Travanti is playing a redneck and can’t keep his accent. If you’ve ever wanted to see him in a speedo, this movie’s the one for you. It’s shocking he couldn’t find better work after “Hill Street Blues.”

Faye Dunaway, I can sort of understand. She was at the end of her career. She still gives the best performance by far. Even if it’s sometimes silly. She reunites with Network co-star Ned Beatty, who’s laughably awful as an Australian. They must have needed to make house payments.

Kim Cattrall is bad, with flashes of decent acting. She gives the second best performance.

Leading man John Laughlin is affably bad. Sometimes his Southern accent breaks through.

The film ends with a decent thriller sequence, then that interesting final development I mentioned earlier. Sadly, Holzberg didn’t build the film around those elements.

I imagine the production story is more interesting than the picture itself.

0/4ⓏⒺⓇⓄ

CREDITS

Directed by Roger Holzberg; screenplay by Holzberg and Douglas Weiser, based on a story by Holzberg; director of photography, Henry Vargas; edited by Earl Watson; music by Paul Buckmaster and Al Gorgoni; production designer, Jose Duarte; produced by Mathew Hayden; released by Vestron Pictures.

Starring John Laughlin (Jeff Schubb), Faye Dunaway (Helen Barton), Daniel J. Travanti (Morely Barton), Kim Cattrall (Alexa Schubb), Pedro De Pool (Captain Mendoza) and Ned Beatty (Ellis).

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