Patrick Storck

Muppet Sherlock Holmes 4 (November 2010)

Storck wraps it all up, which is a little sad–a sequel does not seem to be in the offing. He does tie it all together nicely here, though I’m not familiar enough with “The Musgrave Ritual” to know how close he sticks to it and the conclusion, from “The Final Problem,” is expectedly loose. Mebberson […]

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Muppet Sherlock Holmes 3 (October 2010)

I can’t decide if this issue is the strongest or if it’s just the one where Gonzo solves the case…. The opening titles establish the cast–Kermit and Piggy are now permanent additions (Piggy’s Irene Adler now impersonating Mrs. Hudson, which is a great way to keep her around)–and it certainly seems like Muppet Sherlock Holmes […]

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Muppet Sherlock Holmes 2 (September 2010)

The second issue is as nice as the first. Storck doesn’t use “Muppet Show” standards (he did in the first issue for a great narrative device), but he does insert Kermit’s Inspector Lestrade–sorry, Inspector LeStrade–into the story. I don’t think Lestrade was in “A Scandal in Bohemia,” but he’s around here, a third wheel affixed […]

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Muppet Sherlock Holmes 1 (August 2010)

Now here’s a lovely comic. Mebberson’s art alone makes Muppet Sherlock Holmes worth picking up–oh, she does the colors too. I was just going to say how great the colors work in the book. Her renditions of the Muppet characters, particularly the expressions, really bring them to life. It’s not something I think about a […]

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Muppet Snow White 4 (July 2010)

Now… this issue is an unmitigated disaster. Snider and Storck cut loose–free of the Snow White plot, shattering the fourth wall as the book entirely loses track of itself–and it’s bad. I don’t know if I’d come back for another Muppet book with the same writing team. It’s more a failure in editing, since some […]

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Muppet Snow White 3 (June 2010)

Remember when I said Snider and Storck were going to run into major pacing issues? They spend half this issue (or thereabouts) on a rock concert for the Electric Mayhem (who are the dwarves in Muppet Snow White) being threatened by one of the Queen’s assassins. Maybe both of them, I couldn’t keep track because […]

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Muppet Snow White 2 (May 2010)

I’ve decided Paroline’s art works well for Muppet Snow White. The book doesn’t require any suspension of disbelief–it’s hard to use that term when talking about a Muppet story–as the reader is constantly reminded it’s the Muppets doing a Snow White “performance,” as opposed to it just being Snow White told with a Muppet cast. […]

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Muppet Snow White 1 (April 2010)

Snider and Storck take many four pages in the middle of this issue as an aside. Yes, they introduce Snow White and her prince, but it’s mostly just them having a lot of fun with the script. When the comic opens, it’s very much in the vein of the Muppet Treasure Island movie, down to […]

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Muppet King Arthur 4 (March 2010)

A happy ending for King Arthur? The writers even comment on it. It does work, of course–so well I didn’t even think of a happy ending being out of place until they mentioned it. For this issue, Boom! upgraded the paper stock to something shiny. It holds the colors much better and gives Muppet King […]

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Muppet King Arthur 3 (February 2010)

And the need for an overall narrative–or at least plot progression–finally catches up. The comic even opens with it, as Kermit (as Arthur) complains to his knights about their lack of activity. They’ve just been sitting around since the last issue. So off they go looking for the Holy Grail. Muppet King Arthur might be […]

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Muppet King Arthur 2 (January 2010)

Apparently someone agreed with me. The art this issue is from James Silvani (with a different colorist too) and the whole thing is different. It looks fantastic. The Muppets are fully realized, not amateurish sketches, and Silvani loves the Camelot backgrounds. It’s an amazing difference. The script is even better too, with Benjamin and Storck […]

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Muppet King Arthur 1 (December 2009)

Muppet King Arthur has one rather big problem. It doesn’t really have any other problems, actually, as the writing is great–it’s funny as a Muppet comic–there’s plenty of the self-aware anachronisms the genre (the Muppet retelling) has always had, both in film and comic mediums. It’s also smart like a Muppet comic (or film) should […]

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