Tag Archives: Mack Sennett

All Night Long (1924, Harry Edwards)

Harry Edwards flops on every sight gag in All Night Long, seemingly a combination of his inability to direct comedy and star Harry Langdon’s lack of comic timing. However, otherwise Edwards does a great job with the short. He’s got an excellent dinner table sequence and a lot of special effect work is outstanding.

Long has a couple bookends but primarily takes place during World War I in France. Marines Langdon and Vernon Dent fight over a girl. Dent and Natalie Kingston, who plays the girl, are both excellent. Dent’s comic timing is spot on and he makes up for Langdon.

Langdon isn’t so much bad, just unfunny. Long‘s narrative is relatively complicated–a comic take on a melodrama–and Langdon’s wrong for it.

Edwards’s comic failings are mostly forgivable, except when he tries turning grotesque war imagery into belabored sight gags. It’s awkward and tiresome, while Long otherwise isn’t.

1/3Not Recommended

CREDITS

Directed by Harry Edwards; written by Hal Conklin and Vernon Smith; directors of photography, Lee Davis and William Williams; edited by William Hornbeck; produced by Mack Sennett; released by Pathé Exchange.

Starring Harry Langdon (Harry Hall), Natalie Kingston (Nanette Burgundy), Vernon Dent (Gale Wyndham), Fanny Kelly (Mrs. Burgundy) and Leo Sulky (Mr. Burgundy).


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Recreation (1914, Charles Chaplin)

Chaplin’s got a real problem with visual continuity in Recreation. At first, he does really well. The actors move–through a park–from left to right. Helen Carruthers is on a bench with a prospective beau (Charles Bennett), then she leaves him and moves right. Chaplin (as the Tramp) enters and moves right to follow her.

Eventually he has to move further right, where he starts throwing bricks at Bennett. Recreation makes me wonder if brick throwing was a big thing in the teens.

Anyway, there’s a bunch of action between the different shots and it’s really great. Then Chaplin breaks it for the finish, multiple times, and the jump is rather annoying.

Otherwise, Recreation is a good deal of fun. Chaplin and his actors have a great time with the physical comedy; the Tramp’s undeniably charming. Shame an island appeared out of nowhere to set up the final gag.

2/3Recommended

CREDITS

Written, edited and directed by Charles Chaplin; director of photography, Frank D. Williams; produced by Mack Sennett; released by Mutual Film.

Starring Charles Chaplin (Tramp), Helen Carruthers (Girl), Charles Bennett (Seaman), Edwin Frazee (Short Cop) and Edward Nolan (Tall Cop).


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Cruel, Cruel Love (1914, George Nichols)

Cruel, Cruel Love has a lot of possibilities. Sadly, director Nichols doesn’t realize any of them. He’s interested in broad physical humor–wrestling, actually–and having Charlie Chaplin mug for the camera. Chaplin does a fine enough job mugging, but it goes on forever.

Love concerns an engaged couple, Chaplin and Minta Durfee. When Durfee sees him helping her maid (after the maid trips), Durfee ends the engagement. Already, Love‘s on its own plane of reality.

Chaplin responds by drinking poison, hence the mugging as he convulses. Except he didn’t really take poison, his butler (Edgar Kennedy) tricked him. Maybe he wanted to see Chaplin mug for the camera too.

The viewer knows Chaplin’s fine almost immediately, which kills Love‘s suspense. I kept waiting for Nichols and writer Craig Hutchinson to do something smart with the plot. I’m still waiting.

Love‘s not a terrible short, but it’s a lame one.

1/3Not Recommended

CREDITS

Directed by George Nichols; written by Craig Hutchinson; director of photography, Frank D. Williams; produced by Mack Sennett; released by Mutual Film.

Starring Charles Chaplin (The Lord), Edgar Kennedy (The Butler), Minta Durfee (The Lady), Eva Nelson (The Maid) and William Hauber (The Gardener).


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Super-Hooper-Dyne Lizzies (1925, Del Lord)

Super-Hooper-Dyne Lizzies explores the dangers of electric cars. Basically, they can be taken over by radio waves and made to do crazy things. If it weren’t for the gasoline dealer (John J. Richardson) being the villain, one could almost see it as twenties gas company propaganda.

The short is a special effects extravaganza and director Lord does pretty well with it. There are all sorts of car effects, some okay wirework and a few other things. Sadly, the rampant racism overshadows any of the short’s positive qualities.

At one point, co-writers Frank Capra and Jefferson Moffitt posit blacks are actually not living creatures. Where’s Robert Riskin when you need him….

There’s also some anti-Semitism, but it might be from title card writers Felix Adler and Al Giebler.

The first half is mildly amusing with the special effects. But the second half makes it Lizzies unpleasant overall.

1/3Not Recommended

CREDITS

Directed by Del Lord; screenplay by Frank Capra and Jefferson Moffitt; titles by Felix Adler and Al Giebler; directors of photography, George Spear and George Unholz; edited by William Hornbeck; produced by Mack Sennett; released by Pathé Exchange.

Starring Billy Bevan (Hiram Case), Andy Clyde (Burbank Watts), Lillian Knight (Minnie Watts) and John J. Richardson (T. Potter Doam).


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