Lyman Ward, Stan Ivar, and Wendy Schaal find hunting space monsters tiring work in CREATURE, directed by William Malone for Trans World Entertainment.

Creature (1985, William Malone)

I'm hesitant to pay Creature any compliments, but it does have some unexpected plot developments. Not regarding the space monster, which rips off Alien comprehensively–though stoutly–but in how director Malone and co-writer Alan Reed plot the film. They have a large cast to work through as alien food and eventually move away from the Ten Indians style. It doesn't make the film much better, but it does make certain plot developments unexpected.

They also give some of the characters actual arcs. The actors don't do anything with these opportunities, but they do have them.

The easiest place to jab at Creature is Malone's direction. He's got a nice wide Panavision frame and no idea what to put in it. If the photography were more competent–either Harry Mathias can't light or the film stock was atrocious–some of the more awkward shots would be interesting. Low budget filmmaking sometimes leads to lots of innovation. Not so in the case of Creature.

Really, the only good thing about the film is Klaus Kinski's ludicrous, scenery chewing–literally–turn as a horny West German guy. He brings a nice amount of derision for the material but also acceptance of his place in it.

The rest of the acting is awful. Leading man Stan Ivar and his erstwhile sidekick, Lyman Ward, are astounding calm for being hunted by a monster. Diane Salinger and Wendy Schaal are weak, if somewhat less lethargic. The other cast members are indistinctly bad.

Malone plays Creature with a straight face. Big mistake.

0/4ⓏⒺⓇⓄ

CREDITS

Directed by William Malone; written by Malone and Alan Reed; director of photography, Harry Mathias; edited by Bette Jane Cohen; music by Thomas Chase and Steve Rucker; produced by Malone and William G. Dunn; released by Trans World Entertainment.

Starring Stan Ivar (Mike Davison), Wendy Schaal (Beth Sladen), Lyman Ward (David Perkins), Robert Jaffe (Jon Fennel), Diane Salinger (Melanie Bryce), Annette McCarthy (Dr. Wendy H. Oliver), Marie Laurin (Susan Delambre) and Klaus Kinski (Hans Rudy Hofner).

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