Category Archives: Short

Vesper (2017, Keyvan Sheikhalishahi)

Vesper has something like six “gotcha” reveals, which is a lot for a killer. Especially since Vesper runs twenty-three minutes. And the first gotcha is in the first five minutes. The experience of watching the film quickly becomes waiting for director Sheikhalishahi to spring another one.

The story has (maybe) agoraphobic Agnès Godey being stalked by ex-husband Götz Otto (or is she?). Her nephew, played by Sheikhalishahi, comes to visit her. He suffers from photophobia (or does he?) and gets involved. Godey is also being haunted by a spectre of Otto (or is… you get the idea), which she fails to reveal to Sheikhalishahi (or… you already got it, sorry).

Sheikhalishahi’s direction is pretty good. He’s a little too obvious in his thriller moods–especially with Gréco Casadesus’s overbearing score–and Jean-Claude Aumont’s photography, while gorgeous, is all wrong for what Sheikhalishahi’s trying to do. Aumont gives luscious reality while the characters exist in Gothic nightmare.

Sheikhalishahi’s script is a mess, though at least consistent, I suppose.

Godey’s okay when the script’s okay, which tends to be when she’s opposite Sheikhalishahi. He’s not good in those scenes, but whatever. It’s just nice to see Godey doing well by then. Otto’s in a similar boat. He’s better when the script’s better; he gets a great villain showdown beach scene with would-be hero Sheikhalishahi. Unfortunately, it doesn’t signal a change in the narrative, which just goes back to being gotcha-happy.

With the strong production values, the technical excellences, and the competent performances, Vesper ought to be a lot better. It’s a shame about the script.

1/3Not Recommended

CREDITS

Written, directed, and produced by Keyvan Sheikhalishahi; director of photography, Jean-Claude Aumont; edited by Marie-Jo Nenert; music by Gréco Casadesus; production designer, Sheikhalishahi.

Starring Götz Otto (Walter), Agnès Godey (Marge), and Keyvan Sheikhalishahi (Christian).


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Dark Legacy (2017, Anthony Pietromonaco)

Dark Legacy opens with a shot of a solar system. The “camera” descends to one of the planets. Then we find out it’s a Star Wars short. Because, until that point, director Pietromonaco could be doing anything. He’s just showcasing the visuals. Not showing off. Showcasing. It’s such a nice difference.

Anyway, back on the planet Erin Wu has to kill Fabien Garcia (he’s in a Sith mask, with Dave Thomas doing the voice). Neither of the Dave Thomases you’re thinking of. Different one. Wu doesn’t have many lines (if any), while Thomas has evil Darth Vader knock-off monologues. Even though the production values are strong, Pietromonaco starts to lose pace. There’s a lot of exposition, a lot of distraction.

And then comes the lightsaber duel. It’s in pitch black with the opponents turning off their lightsabers for subterfuge. Almost all of the fight choreography is great–Wu does an inexplicable kick–but otherwise, it’s awesome. Pietromonaco puts the viewer behind the lightsaber, but without making it cheap. Instead it’s graceful and lovely; the editing is fantastic. And without a credited editor. Pietromonaco perhaps?

But then the reality of being a Star Wars short returns and Dark Legacy starts to drag again. But it doesn’t go too long. Pietromonaco never rushes it, but the finale is brisk. It’s either visually stunning or it’s brisk. Never both.

The lightsaber duel in Dark Legacy is fantastic and it doesn’t go on too long afterwards to make you want to stop it.

2/3Recommended

CREDITS

Directed by Anthony Pietromonaco; screenplay by Pietromonaco, based on a story by Pietromonaco and Alex Chinnici; director of photography, Chinnici; music by Michael Meinhart; produced by Chadd Dorak.

Starring Erin Wu (Kia) and Fabien Garcia & Dave Thomas (The Master).


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Literal Bohemian Rhapsody (2016, Sam Gorski and Niko Pueringer)

Literal Bohemian Rhapsody is the filler footage for a bad music video for the Queen song, Bohemian Rhapsody. It’s literal, so Jeff Schine is actually running around telling his mother things and shooting people and whatever.

Except he doesn’t shoot the guy right. Because a lot of Literal is just stock footage.

It might work better as an actual commercial for the stock footage place, actually. As its own adaptation of the song, it’s severely lacking. There’s creative enthusiasm from directors Gorski and Pueringer, but it’s simultaneously truncated and stuck. Everything in Literal is about the gimmick. So it doesn’t matter if Schine and Deborah Ramaglia (playing, you know, “Mama”) aren’t good. Though Ramaglia is fine. Schine isn’t, but who knows if it’s his fault or it’s just because it’s a cute, bad idea.

Once Gorski and Pueringer reveal the second setting, it’s all kind of pointless. Sure, they can do it. So what. If it were part of a demo reel, if Beelzebub actually showed up, if it had a Wayne’s World reference, it might be something. Instead, it’s proof of concept. Magnifico-o-o-o-o.

1/3Not Recommended

CREDITS

Directed by Sam Gorski and Niko Pueringer; screenplay by Gorski and Pueringer, based on the song by Freddie Mercury; produced by Gorski, Pueringer, and Jake Watson; released by Corridor Digital.

Starring Jeff Schine (Freddie) and Deborah Ramaglia (Mama).


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Darkness Falls (2016, Jarno Lee Vinsencius)

Darkness Falls runs fifteen minutes. The entire short film is set up for its end twist, which multi-hyphenate (including writer and director) Vinsencius hides fairly well. The short never meanders towards its conclusion, instead it just stops and muscles through a bunch of expository dialogue and then ends. The narrative requires newly introduced characters to be stupider than previously introduced characters say they should be. But then the movie stops so is the twist good enough to cover it all?

No, especially not considering how little work Vinsencius puts into establishing the characters. The short opens with Joanna Häggblom waking up an amnesiac in the middle of the forest. Two weeks later, after she’s apparently found her way back to her normal life–without remembering anything except her taste in fashion–Demis Tzivis shows up and tells her what should be a tall tale except for the menacing biker chicks after them.

There’s some kind of a chase sequence–more like a running sequence (well, driving sequence)–that lengthy exposition scene I mentioned, the setup for the twist and then the twist. As a director, Vinsencius does okay with the Panavision aspect ratio. His photography is solid. His editing isn’t, it’s fine but it doesn’t breathe with its protagonist. And once Tzivis shows up, Häggblom is basically just along for the ride. She asks questions and makes inquisitive expressions.

Decent support from Livia Emma Tsirk. Not so much from Niclas Fransson as Brain.

Darkness Falls is never scary, never disturbing; it’s never clear if it’s supposed to be either. But Vinsencius’s photography is strong and his composition’s competent enough. His script just doesn’t go anywhere and he doesn’t find any rhythm with the actors.

1/3Not Recommended

CREDITS

Written, directed, photographed, edited and produced by Jarno Lee Vinsencius.

Starring Joanna Häggblom (Melissa), Demis Tzivis (David), Anna-Sara Kennedy (Margareta), Livia Emma Tsirk (Amanda) and Niclas Fransson (Felix).


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